CEBM response: “Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes”

CEBM Response: to the report “Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes” from the National Obesity Forum in association with the “Public Health Collaboration”

 

Initiatives to provide trustworthy evidence-based dietary and nutrition information to patients and clinicians about type 2 diabetes and obesity should be welcome. However the report, released by the National Obesity Forum (NOF) in collaboration with the newly formed “Public Health Collaboration”, appears to be highly unsystematic in its approach to the recommendations it makes and will likely add to the confusion and misinformation provided to practitioners, patients and members of the general public.

Based on the methods used in generating this report there are a number of reasons why the reliability and robustness of its recommendations should be questioned:

The impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes, on both the individual and society, remains considerable, arguably one of the largest public health problems of the current era. Effective measures to prevent and reduce the burden of ill health should seek to be patient focused, include the best available and most up to date evidence and wherever possible be consistent.  Unfortunately dietary and nutritional advice is one of the most contentious, misunderstood and misreported areas of public health. Polarised views and “expert” opinions further inflate these problems. A report of this nature, from professional groups, carries particular responsibility to adopt a systematic, rigorous and transparent approach if it is to help and not hinder improvements in diet and reduce the burden of preventable diseases.

Ends.

Authors of statement

Dr David Nunan  Departmental Lecturer in Evidence Based Medicine

David.nunan@phc.ox.ac.uk

Dr Kamal R. Mahtani – GP and Deputy Director

Kamal.mahtani@phc.ox.ac.uk

Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford.

This response will be posted on www.cebm.net and a PDF of this statement can be downloaded here.

Disclaimer

Dr David Nunan and Dr Kamal R. Mahtani are both members of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) steering committee to support the new Physical Activity and Lifestyle clinical priority.

Both Dr Nunan and Dr Mahtani have received funding for research from the NHS National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research (NIHR SPCR) and the RCGP for independent research projects related to physical activity and dietary interventions. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, the RCGP or the Department of Health.

They declare no other relevant conflicts of interest.

 

Related news

Wednesday 8 June 2016 The National Obesity Forum (NOF) has no plans to replace the four members who resigned last week – after a controversial pro-fat report was released by mistake – according to the organisation

Friday 3 June 2016 National Obesity Forum board members resign over controversial report on fat intake – International Business Times

Friday 3 June 2016 Anti-obesity campaigners resign over low-fat diet report – The Guardian

Friday 3 June 2016 Statement from the National Obesity Forum

Tuesday 31 May 2016 Should you really eat fat to stay slim? The new food rules explained – The Telegraph

Sunday 29 May 2016 National Obesity Forum faces backlash over ‘extremely dangerous’ diet advice – The Independent

Saturday 28 May 2016 National Obesity Forum faces backlash over ‘dangerous’ diet advice – The Guardian

Monday 23 May 2016 Report attacks official guidance on low-fat diets – NHS Choices 

Monday 23 May 2016 Between a rock and a lard place – is fat good for us, or what? – The Guardian

Monday 23 May 2016 Public Health England: Advice to eat more fat ‘irresponsible’ BBC news

Monday 23 May 2016 Official advice on low-fat diet and cholesterol is wrong, says health charity – The Guardian

Sunday 22 May 2016 Expert reaction to new report on diet as published by the National Obesity Forum – Science Media Centre

 

Kamal Mahtani

About Kamal Mahtani

Kamal R. Mahtani is a GP and and Clinical Lecturer at the University of Oxford

View more posts by Kamal Mahtani

24 comments on “CEBM response: “Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes”

  1. Are you suggesting that the host of Doctors including some independent thinking NHS doctors are using LCHF (lower carb higher fat) are misguided.

    Do you doubt their blogs, patient case studies and sometimes their own significant weight loss?

    I see 3 parties

    – pharmaceutical companies with 10s of millions to lose
    – dietician aligned and funded to corporate backed research
    – free thinking results driven doctors and dieticians who are using their common sense

    Who is going to fund the required evidence based research to RCT standard in the current set up. Perhaps a university faculty funded by Unilever?

    No thanks – quite simply, the truth of LCHF is being suppressed.

    I have seen dissection of the reports you have cited – especially the Cochrane Report and that all cause mortality increased on a low (er) carb diet, sounds like a brexit project fear Daily Express article.

    Myself – I am not overweight nor do I have diabetes but I tried lchf (Tim Noakes Banting Diet) from Christmas through to March and still use lower carb options like breakfast – high fat Sheeps milk yoghurt, homemade muesli (nuts and seeds), a few blueberries.

    The key is no need to snack – as this breakfast takes me right the way through with no cravings at 11ish any more and we all know the science as to why, don’t we?

  2. Carbs aren’t the problem – the way you’re eating them is the problem. I found the key is “healthy eating” during the day and using the dinner hour as the ‘feast’. Rotating your ‘carbs’ in this manner allows you to shed fat and keep your metabolism elevated ( read here how it works : http://findperfectdiet.com/carbs-at-night-or-the-half-day-diet/ ) I am willing to continue to use it constantly as it perfectly fits my diet and lifestyle. It makes more sense than diets that promote avoidance certain foods or nutrients I’m not feeling tired and completely depleted like when I was just low carbing

    • Hello unfortunately the disease is common being a global fashion, by reason of physical inactivity and poor diet on a daily basis thanks for sharing this article

    • This is a subject I like very much to follow, because seeing many friends with diabetes in an increasing number and being able to help with information and new treatments, makes me very happy.

  3. おはようございます。
    悪玉コレステロールが増えると大変危ないと言われているのは常識です。私は会社の検診でldlコレステロールや中性脂肪の数値が高く、医者からも注意されるぐらいでした。そこで見つけたのがきなりです。大変大量のサプリを検証した後、最終的にこれに辿り着いたという話です。希望のある人生を今後も続けたい方は興味があればご覧下さい。

  4. It is entirely possible to reverse type 2 diabetes in most cases and reduce the consumption of drugs dramatically in type 1, but of course, the pharmaceutical industry invoice his billions with that, do you think will want to give his ok for healing without drugs? Here in Brazil a doctor who insists the idea has already been bombarded by big media.

  5. It’s really true:”The impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes, on both the individual and society, remains considerable, arguably one of the largest public health problems of the current era. Effective measures to prevent and reduce the burden of ill health should seek to be patient focused, include the best available and most up to date evidence and wherever possible be consistent. Unfortunately dietary and nutritional advice is one of the most contentious, misunderstood and misreported areas of public health. Polarised views and “expert” opinions further inflate these problems. A report of this nature, from professional groups, carries particular responsibility to adopt a systematic, rigorous and transparent approach if it is to help and not hinder improvements in diet and reduce the burden of preventable diseases.”

  6. It’s difficult to find the right information to solve a health problem, especially with established publications publishing conflicting information with what they published before! Although authoritative sources play a large role in filtering information, not everything published by such sources can have an effect on the individual level. It seems that it’s still up to the individual to do their research and find the solution that works for them, isn’t it?

  7. When it comes to weight loss you will always have counterverses in grating the physical activity and nutrition.

  8. Diabetes is a very serious disease and needs to be reversed and treated with great caution and seriousness, otherwise it can bring many problems throughout life. This is certainly an excellent article on how to achieve reversal.

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