Do you teach critical thinking about health claims? Then here’s our Christmas wish…

img_5834-jpg

Matt Oxman/Informed Health Choices project

There are endless unreliable claims about the effects of treatments. To avoid being misled, people must think critically. Learning how to think this way should start early. Children and young people are not only going to make more and more personal health choices for themselves; they are the health professionals and policymakers of tomorrow.

With the EvIdeNce into Schools and TEachINg (EinSTein) project, CEBM is bringing evidence-based medicine—particularly critical appraisal—into secondary schools, with Sarah Pannell, CEBM Honourary Fellow and biology teacher at Lingfield Notre Dame School.

As Sarah notes in a recent Christmas-themed CEBM blog post: “GCSE exams are starting to test students’ critical thinking skills, for example by asking students to evaluate data provided on a particular topic, but students need opportunities to practise these skills during the taught curriculum.”

This is where the EinSTein project comes in. The idea is to identify or develop EBM learning resources that fit the curriculum, allowing students to improve those critical thinking skills, while their teachers are still able to cover all the necessary content.

Testing treatments interactive is a partner in the EinSTein project. Meanwhile, our team is also developing a website to make teaching EBM easier and more enjoyable. The site will include resources like those identified and developed as part of EinSTein.

To improve the content and user-friendliness of the site, we need help from target users. We are particularly interested in hearing from secondary school teachers.

Besides teaching critical thinking about treatment claims at secondary school level or higher, the only requirement is fluency in English. Participation is compensated. For more information and to get in touch, go to: www.testingtreatments.org/call-for-participants.

Happy holidays and best wishes,

The Testing Treatments interactive team


Read more about the EinSTein project here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *