Blog

Evidence-based thinking and why it matters
Views expressed may represent the views of the author and not necessarily those of CEBM as a group

Realist Reviews and Realist Evaluation

In health care and many other fields of research, interventions are often described as being complex and have outcomes that

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Evidence-based practice in the Calais refugee camp

DPhil student Jack O’Sullivan spent the Easter break providing first aid care to the 6000 refugees of Calais, France, and

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When I use an evidence-based word . . .

2. The roots of language Which words came first? In his Historiai, Book II, Herodotus tells how an Egyptian king, Psamtik

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Trial publication records

  Funding Bodies give money to institutions to undertake research to ultimately improve patient care.   And to achieve this aim

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Access to trial data: done and dusted?

  Honorary Research Fellow Tom Jefferson talks Tamiflu, trials and transparency in his latest blog for CEBM.   In 2009

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Beyond the buffet table: celebrating the past to inform the future

The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group (CTAG) is one of Cochrane’s editorial groups specialising in evidence synthesis for the prevention and

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Evidence-Based Healthcare Fellowships

  The Oxford AHSN Fellowship programme which supports innovators working across the NHS is now in its second year. The

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The Sharapova drug story: What’s the evidence? Part 1

Many have commented on the how, who, what and ethical implications following Maria Sharapova’s shock revelation of her failed drugs test. Few

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When I use an evidence-based word . . .

1. Blogs and Logs This is the first entry in a CEBM blog about medical philology. It seems natural then

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Designing Cardiovascular Risk Communication

Dylan Collins & Stefania Marcoli discuss how they are re-designing cardiovascular risk communication strategies for clinical practice, intersecting evidence-based medicine,

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Does hospital mortality rise on weekdays? Possibly

In this weeks BMJ, Fiona Godlee, asks important questions about who had access, and when they had access to a

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Can randomised controlled trials be more efficient?

In a previous blog, we discussed the value of reducing waste by conducting appropriate and timely systematic reviews. But how

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Guidelines or tramlines? Putting cancer guidance back on track.

“Does this make them good doctors or bad doctors?” was my favourite response to the Pulse article “GP’s are bending

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How did NEJM respond when we tried to correct 20 misreported trials?

This blog was written by Ben Goldacre, Henry Drysdale, Ioan Milosevic, Aaron Dale, Philip Hartley, Eirion Slade, Anna Powell-Smith, Kamal

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Does talcum powder cause cancer? (Based on the news coverage, I have no idea!)

  The Guardian reported yesterday that the family of a woman who sadly died of ovarian cancer is to recieve

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