Blog posts by Kamal Mahtani

Kamal Mahtani

About Kamal Mahtani

Kamal R. Mahtani is a GP and and Clinical Lecturer at the University of Oxford

A CRASH course on the importance of systematic reviews in healthcare

“The notion of systematic review – looking at the totality of evidence – is quietly one of the most important

Read More

Acupuncture for baby colic? - here's my gripe

So, is acupuncture the “miracle cure” for babies with colic?     Many parents will know that managing the common

Read More

Graduate Entry Medicine: EBM and Research Methods

2016 October 2016 Lecture 1 Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine 2017 February 2017 Lecture 2 Critical Appraisal of Randomised Controlled Trials February 2017

Read More

New treatments for atrial fibrillation

This is a pre-publication version of an editorial appearing in the BMJ by Kamal R. Mahtani and Carl Heneghan We

Read More

Beware evidence “spin” : an important source of bias in the reporting of clinical research

Evidence Live 2016 begins this week, with 3 full days of discussion and learning around 5 main themes including  “Transforming

Read More

Eating fat and cutting carbs

CEBM response to “Eat Fat, Cut The Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes” Initiatives to

Read More

Evidence based mentoring for “aspiring academics”

    CEBM deputy director Kamal R. Mahtani writes on the value of mentoring. There are times in our careers

Read More

All health researchers should begin their training by preparing at least one systematic review

Here is the pre publication script (version 2) of an article published in the Journal of the Royal Society of

Read More

Can randomised controlled trials be more efficient?

In a previous blog, we discussed the value of reducing waste by conducting appropriate and timely systematic reviews. But how

Read More

How often are outcomes switched in clinical trials? And why does it matter?

Kamal R. Mahtani and Ben Goldacre, part of the COMPare project, write about the prevalence of outcome switching and why it matters.

Read More

Utilising systematic reviews: is another trial necessary or ethical?

You don’t have to look too far to see the benefits of systematic reviews and their summary results. The well

Read More

Outcome reporting bias: if you say you're going to do something, do it!

Selective reporting of outcomes is just one type of reporting bias and there are a number of ways in which

Read More

Outcome reporting bias: is it ok to be a little selective?

A large part of being a scientist is venturing into the unknown. You come up with hypotheses and test them

Read More

General practice clinical pharmacists: an opportunity to be innovative or cynical?

Declining resources, an ageing population, multi-morbidity and rising demands are just some of the reasons adding to an unsustainable workload

Read More

The evidence, the expert opinions and the reaction: a teaching example

The recent story around exercise and physical activity prompted me to write a blog “Abandon exercise? Only if you believe

Read More